Summer Cooper: Farmer, Forager.

love these boots

Summer Star Cooper was born in the living room of an old farm house in the Indiana countryside. She and her nine sisters had a very religious upbringing. The family did not watch television or movies, listen to secular radio, or read secular literature, so they filled their time reading, crafting, and playing outside.

After spending some years in her twenties in the Pacific Northwest and working on an organic farm in Western Washington State, Summer returned to her hometown. There she and her sister ran a small produce farm on their family’s property for a couple years. These days, the self-described forager, sustainable farmer, and vagrant splits her time between field and forest. Continue reading

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All The Good Books.

“All good books are alike in that they are truer than if they had really happened and after you are finished reading one you will feel that all that happened to you and afterwards it all belongs to you; the good and the bad, the ecstasy, the remorse and sorrow, the people and the places and how the weather was.”

Ernest Hemingway

“Happy” In ASL, Part 2.

I’m madly in love with this video. It’s a gorgeous and incredibly joyful (well, how can it not be?) ASL interpretation of Pharrell’s “Happy” performed by campers at Deaf Film Camp–a two-week camp for deaf and hard-of-hearing teens held at Camp Mark Seven, in the Adirondacks in Old Forge, NY.

Also appearing in the music video are Bim Ajadi, Deaf filmaker and director, Rosa Lee Timm, Deaf performance artist, and Azora Telford, CODA and interpreter, all teaching or mentoring at Deaf Film Camp. Rosa Lee and Azora also produced the film. I’m beyond thrilled to discover these incredibly talented people and their works. Enjoy!

via The Limping Chicken

(Take a look at another fun interpretation of “Happy” in ASL.)

 

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A Beautiful Ripple Effect.

There has been a beautiful ripple effect emanating from the tragic loss of Robin Williams. Many  creative people are coming forward to share how depression shapes their lives. Reading their words is slowly helping me to begin pulling words out of a stuck place deep inside.

A Moment for Robin Williams by Victoria Smith cracks open the stereotype of a depressed person by speaking of the extra perception many of us experience, feeling beautiful and sad things so deeply they are difficult to bear alone.

Read her thoughts here.